Market Day in Honfleur, France

Saturday is market day in Honfleur.

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And that means fresh seafood

Local produce

Normandy cheese & butter

Sausages & Ham hocks

Delicious cooked items

Lip-smacking Foie de Volaille

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Juicy roasted farm chicken

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Loaves of spice bread

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And tea.

Pastry shops line the street.

Nearby, the picturesque old port charmed artists such as Gustave Courbet, Eugène Boudin and Johan Barthold Jongkind to step en plein air (into open air) and capture its shimmering lights. The result of which is the beginning of the impressionist movement.

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There is no question that Honfleur is my favorite town in Normandy.

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20 thoughts on “Market Day in Honfleur, France

  1. I know you live in Seattle and get ‘locally sourced’ food there, but honestly how come everything tastes better in Europe?
    I think I know why, and it is depressing to think that most Americans don’t even know what unpolluted food should taste like. We just basically don’t know the difference. I am also dumb this way. In Eastern Europe I ate eggs recently, I actually said “Why does this taste so eggy? Why are yolks orange?”
    Then of course of dawned on me. And I remembered all the homes on the train with free roaming chickens
    You have to admit, even when we think we are smart, our country is somewhat dumb by comparison.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I completely agree with you Cindy. It’s a price we pay to live here 😦 But I can tell it is getting a lot better. At least in Seattle, I buy my weekly grocery from the farmer’s market where I get foraged mushrooms from the woods, apples from the orchard in Eastern Washington, oysters near the San Juan Islands and a good variety of wild caught salmons. It is not France, but I love it. Now if only we have a good patisserie nearby, it would be perfect 🙂

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  2. Fantastic pictures and post. We love Honfleur, did you see the old wooden church? When we went they were smoking fish on the quay. Living in France many people still shop daily for the freshest produce and raise their own chickens and vegetables. The food is fantastic quality but eating is expensive too.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m drooling, and longing to return to Honfleur. I never saw the market while I was there, perhaps just as well as I’m inclined to buy too much cheese which doesn’t make me popular with fellow travellers. I do get good locally sourced fish, meal and vegetables here on the Isle of Wight (UK) but I don’t get cheese or butter like those of Normandy. Also, our hygiene laws makes our markets look less attractive, and as all our cheese and milk products are pasteurized, some of the taste disappears.

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    1. You are absolutely right about the cheese and butter practice in the Anglo-Saxon world. it ruined the taste. Upon returning from my trip, I only buy imported French butter now. The US butter just don’t have the right flavor.

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  4. If there’s just a few beautiful gems I would say are in Normandy, Honfleur is one of them. I was there back in October, and I found it to be such a gorgeous little port town. The outdoor markets were a pleasure; that photo you took of the paella is absolutely drool-worthy! I can imagine just sitting along the quay and admiring the colorful buildings along the water while enjoying lunch. Sounds like a day well-spent!

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