Dublin in June

June 8th kicks off the phase two of Ireland reopening, and with that, we were able to travel anywhere within the county. This has opened up several hiking opportunities.

Howth

We couldn’t wait to get back to Howth, so that’s what we did on our first weekend after June 8th.

We made the mistake of taking the popular cliff walk and there were people everywhere

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making it difficult to follow the 2 meter guideline.

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We did our best to keep the distance and decided to turn around after seeing the lighthouse.

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Honeysuckle blooming along the trail

The following weekend I went back to the area, taking a different trail behind the bus stop. The trail passes through a residential area on the way up which I wasn’t sure of until this sign appeared

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and the view of the Irish Sea confirmed my location.

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Then the wind picked up gearing up to 35 km/hour.

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I should have traversed the golf course,

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But I didn’t. The trail marker disappeared and I was on a road unsure of how to get back to the trail.

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Fortunately a local helped. You must go down these steps, cross the road then go down another set of steps, then turn left…

Trails in Ireland often merges into local roads whereby the sign vanishs into thin air, making it easy to get lost.  

As it turned out, I wasn’t too far off the trail.

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Although the strong coastal wind became worrisome.

Especially at tight corners of the cliff where there’s nothing between me and the roaring sea.

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If you ‘ve never experienced the wind in Ireland, you are likely not to miss it. It happens in all seasons and you will for sure be “blown away” by the sheer power of it. 

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The wind cleared the sky. A fantastic view of the Ireland’s Eye lay in front of me.

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Four trails in Howth

All good hikes must be followed by good food.

How about these succulent Carlingford Oysters from County Louth, freshly shucked at Beshoffs the MarketI would go back to Howth just for them.

Bray-Greystone?

Bray to Greystone is another secnic cliff walk close to Dublin.

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We prefer to start the walk from Bray as this view of the sea is instantly gratifying.

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As it turned out, the trail was closed due to social distancing concerns. Instead of heading back to Dublin, we opted for the de Buitléar Way, named after the Irish conservationist and wildlife film maker

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More honeysuckles

We had no idea where the trail is leading, but this cross seemed a landmark.

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After a modest climb, we were at the top of a mount.

How is this for a lunch spot?

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scallion pancake with egg omelette, chorizo and arugula salad

The de Buitléar Way connects to the Bray Head Loop Trail

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It’s farmland beyond this point. The smell confirmed it 🙂

Once the trail turned seaside the views became spectacular

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Looking down, we can spot the DART railroads and the Bray-Greystone trail.

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Foxgloves are in season

Continuing on, the trail turned facing the mountain.

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And just like that, we were out of this gate and back on the main road.

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Thanks to Dublin bus #84 driver who completely ignored us at the stop and drove on, we saw this cutie with his head popping out of the wall, eager to greet people.

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But who needs a bus when we can get back on the trail and complete the loop.

In the end, we prefer this route much more than the popular Bray-Greystone walk – it is less crowded and affords more diverse landscape.

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Phase 3 of the Ireland reopening started on June 29th and we would be able to travel anywhere on the island. Anywhere that is 🙂

24 thoughts on “Dublin in June

      1. LOL – you have to learn a few words that sound like the Irish. My daughter who went to College in Limerick didn’t get an accent in 4 years, but she calls “boys” the “lads,” and other cute expressions. Cookies are now biscuits. 🙂 Oh, and she learned – EVERY house has a Kettle!! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Sounds like you’ve been busy for the past two months! Glad that Ireland is resuming normalcy; here in the US, we’re a LONG ways from ever going back to normal. Your hike looks gorgeous, and the encounter with the horse is very assuming. Hope you stay safe and healthy, even after reopening!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The flowers, pathways, and cliffs make me want to travel even more, but it’s the little smiley faces on the sidewalk that made me realize how all around the world we’re experiencing some of the same realities today. Thanks for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wonderful walks! Thanks for taking me along! Found a tour company that puts together inn to inn walking in Ireland but had to stop looking at vacations because it makes my restlessness worse.

    Really envious of everyone who has left the states because I’ve given up hope that this country will get the virus under control. NY is pretty ok for now but w’ll see how it goes with people from other states traveling here.

    Finally went back to Manhattan after 4 months because Vic thought he had a cavity (chipped tooth instead). Felt great to be back. Think I’m starting to loose it. Normally I go to Manhattan at least 2-3x a week. Bay Ridge is a nice neighborhood but it’s kind of conservative. The idea of being stuck out here even longer with a certain set of people is getting to me. I’m not used to being stuck around a tiny circle. Vic is happy as a clam whenever you put him. Normally it’s not an issue it’s nice knowing all sorts of people, feel like and idiot because we’re fine. Having less access to Manhattan is rough for me. I feel like I’m 5 again at the dinner table surrounded by people more conservative than me (not exactly talking politics). We can head to Manhattan but I feel its selfish of me since Vic has a few health issues just because I need to be around a varied crowd.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Oh dear. so sad to hear this. I have been brought up to date by what happened in the States. Good idea to stay put just to be safe. There’s still a lot unknown about this virus. Do plan your trips , it will make you feel better. I hope to see you in Ireland someday. Take care. Hugs!!!

    Like

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