Ferme de la Rançonnière, France

Fifteen kilometers from Bayeux in the village of Crépon,

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lies a 13th century farmhouse called Ferme de la Rançonnière.

Here, the wind howls at night and the bird chirps in the morning.

The rooms are cozy, welcoming with wood beams and furniture.

The food is traditional Normandy.

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making use of local apples

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and seafood

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A hearty fish soup

Did you know that twenty-five percent of oysters in France are produced in Normandy – (Pictured below) no.2 and no.3 oysters from Asnelles with shallots and vinegar – When it comes to French oysters, the smaller the number, the larger the size. Now can you tell which’s which?

Le trou Normand (the Norman Hole) not to be mixed with the 1952 French Comedy starring Brigitte Bardot – is typically served between courses with apple sorbet soaked in Calvados.

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Not a big fan of seafood? Local games is a fair alternative.

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Back of deer with wild mushrooms and root vegetables from the market

unless you are a vegetarian.

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Vegetable pot baked with puff pastry

For dessert, this Black Forest cake is a MUST! It is so decadent that you will want to lick the plate clean.

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Calvados lovers quench their thirst with the cherished golden/brown liquid. No rules govern when the liquor is best consumed. Locals drink it along with their morning coffee, before/after lunch, at teatime and around dinner.

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We tried Pommeau – an aged drink made with two thirds of apple juice and one third of calvados – and discovered that calvados in any shapes or forms is not our thing.

During WWII, la Ferme de la Rançonnière was requisitioned by the German army and served as a military camp, as well as an air force base – its surrounding flat fields offered good visibility for planes to take off and land.

In the afternoon of June 6th 1944 (also known as the D-day), the village was liberated by the British army disembarked at Gold Beach. La Ferme de la Rançonnière became a ration camp where all of the food for British and Canadian soldiers were sorted and stored. The wooden case contained a daily ration of breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner for 14 solders., labeled with letters “A” to “G” for each day of the week. Each ration also contained some bread, 7 cigarettes, chocolates, sweets, salt, matches and toilet paper. (click on photos below to see in detail)

If you find yourself traveling in Normandy with a car, give this place a try. It costs as little as 60€ per night off season. Dinner can be ordered à la carte or with the choice of two tasting menus. (32€ or 44€ each).

Ferme de la Rançonnière
Address: D65, 14480 Crépon, France
Phone: +33 2 31 22 21 73
Webpage: http://www.ranconniere.fr/

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